Home Owner Advice When to humanely euthanize your dog

When to humanely euthanize your dog


Dogs are our trusted companions, and we’d be thrilled if their life spans were as long as our own. Unfortunately, the day comes when it is time to euthanize your dog. It’s important to ensure that the process is humane and handled as quickly and painlessly as possible. Be sure to follow these helpful guidelines for deciding when it’s time to make one of the hardest choices you’ll ever make.

Anton Watman / Shutterstock.com
Anton Watman / Shutterstock.com

1. Speak to a veterinarian

When we’re deciding the fate of our precious friends, it can be hard to be objective. At times like these, it’s crucial to seek an unbiased opinion, so we can remove all doubt that we’re making the correct choice. No one ever wants to pull the plug on their beloved companion too soon. Speaking with a veterinarian can help to alleviate those types of concerns.

Grisha Bruev / Shutterstock.com
Grisha Bruev / Shutterstock.com

2. Loss of faculties

Once your dog has lost the ability to enjoy the same quality of life they’re accustomed to, it is time to humanely euthanize them.

If your dog is blind, they may still be able to get around, but this is because they’ve memorized your current home. A dog who can’t hear should be euthanized, as they are an increased accident risk.

While it may hurt to euthanize an animal who is still ambulatory, blind and deaf dogs can severely injure themselves, leading to an even more painful passage onto doggy heaven.

3. Look them in the eyes

Pets are very different from humans, in the sense that they live in the moment. When a human isn’t feeling well or is beginning to suffer from a physical standpoint, they have the ability to reflect on the past and remember the good times. A pet doesn’t have the benefit of this perspective. Look your dog in the eyes when you’re considering the possibility of euthanization. Your answer awaits you.

Reddogs / Shutterstock.com
Reddogs / Shutterstock.com

4. Weigh the pros and cons

A dog doesn’t have to be euthanized once their health shows the first signs of slippage. But it’s best to weigh the pros and cons.

If your dog is starting to have bad days, the time has come to keep track. Over the course of a month or a few weeks, take a moment to mark down whether your dog is having a good day or a bad one. If the bad ones outnumber the good ones, this is a sign your dog’s ready to be euthanized.

5. Overall quality of life

This involves making an honest assessment of your pet’s current quality of life. Do they seem happy to you? Are they able to run, play, and eat in the same manner that they’ve become accustomed to? If the answer to these questions is no, it’s time to humanely euthanize your canine companion to spare them any additional suffering.

Naruedom Yaempongsa / Shutterstock.com
Naruedom Yaempongsa / Shutterstock.com

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